Anouk Rijs appointed Professor of Analytics of Biomolecular Interactions

Chemist Anouk Rijs has been appointed Professor of Analytics of Biomolecular Interactions at the Department of Chemistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences at VU Amsterdam with effect from 1 October 2020. The appointment is for 1.0 FTE.

09/15/2020 | 4:30 PM

Research
The research of Rijs focuses on the structural characterization and elucidation of molecular mechanisms to understand biological processes at the molecular level. She is particularly interested in peptide and protein aggregation related to neurodegenerative diseases, but also how aggregation is relevant for biological function, biopharmaceuticals, and bio-engineering of smart materials. Recently, Rijs was awarded an NWO-Vici grant by which she aims to unravel and ultimately control and inhibit the aggregation mechanism of neurodegenerative diseases. Examples of neurodegenerative diseases are Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

Education
Rijs is a passionate and experienced lecturer with teaching interests on the interface of analytical chemistry, (bio)physical chemistry and molecular spectroscopy. From there she will significantly contribute to (the reinforcement of) the Bachelor’s programmes Pharmaceutical Sciences and Chemistry, and the track Analytical Sciences within the Chemistry Master’s programme.

CV
Rijs studied Chemistry at VU Amsterdam with a specialisation in analytical and physical chemistry. She obtained her PhD in 2003 at VU Amsterdam in a joined project with the University of Amsterdam and Sandia National Laboratories on femtosecond imaging. Rijs was postdoctoral researcher at the University of Amsterdam and the University of California Santa Barbara, and after obtaining an NWO-Veni grant, at the FOM Institute Rijnhuizen. In 2012 she was appointed assistant, and later associate, professor at the Institute for Molecules and Materials and FELIX Laboratory at Radboud University. Rijs is Deputy Chair at Physical Chemistry Chemical Physics (PCCP) of the Royal Society of Chemistry.

Image: Dick van Aalst (Radboud University)